research

New Survey of Detransitioners – Participants Wanted

*Survey closes on April 30*

Hi,

I’d like to announce recruitment for a new research study designed to better understand the experiences of people who have undergone gender de-transition. For the purpose of this study, gender de-transition is defined as having undergone gender transition related medical procedures (hormones and/or surgeries) and then subsequently de-transitioned. The study is an anonymous online survey. Take a look at the recruitment information and if you are interested, follow the link to the study. Please share the recruitment information and link with anyone you think might be interested and eligible.

Thanks,

Recruitment Information

Study Title: Individuals who received medications and/or surgery for sex reassignment and then de-transitioned: a descriptive study

Gender dysphoria, discomfort about one’s biological sex or assigned gender, is often treated with medications and/or surgery (also called transition). Some individuals choose to “de-transition” by stopping medications and/or having survey to reverse the effects of transition. The purpose of the study is to describe a population of individuals who experienced gender dysphoria, chose to transition by taking medications and/or having surgery, and then de-transitioned (by stopping the medications or having surgery). We are interested in individuals who have de-transitioned, whether they feel positively, negatively, or neutrally about their decision to transition and the time they spent transitioned before de-transitioning. This research study is being conducted by Lisa Littman, MD, MPH, Adjunct Assistant Professor, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.

Previous research shows that the satisfaction rates for transgender individuals who transition is generally high and the regret rates are low, though little is known of those who describe unsatisfactory experiences with transition or de-transition beyond accounts available on social media. An informal survey on social media yielded over 100 surveys from de-transitioned individuals in only two weeks of recruitment. Given that this population exists and has not yet been described in the medical literature, this research is needed to describe this outcome, to generate hypotheses, and to assess the psychological and social needs of persons who have taken, or are considering, this decision.

This survey is completely anonymous and confidential and conducted through Survey monkey, an independent third- party. There is no way to connect your name with your responses. We do not track email or IP addresses. Please do not write in any identifying information about yourself in the open text boxes. The survey should take 30-60 minutes. Participation in this research study is voluntary, and you may refuse or quit at any time before completing the survey. If you know of any individuals with a similar experience who might be eligible for this survey, or any communities where there might be eligible participants, please copy and paste this recruitment information and survey link to share.
Survey Link: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/VZLBVJ3

Link between gender dysphoria and dissociation found

Here is an interesting study I just ran across from Collizi, Costa, and Toldarello, entitled “Dissociative symptoms in individuals with gender dysphoria: Is the elevated prevalence real?”, abstract pasted below:

This study evaluated dissociative symptomatology, childhood trauma and body uneasiness in 118 individuals with gender dysphoria, also evaluating dissociative symptoms in follow-up assessments after sex reassignment procedures were performed. We used both clinical interviews (Dissociative Disorders Interview Schedule) and self-reported scales (Dissociative Experiences Scale). A dissociative disorder of any kind seemed to be greatly prevalent (29.6%). Moreover, individuals with gender dysphoria had a high prevalence of lifetime major depressive episode (45.8%), suicide attempts (21.2%) and childhood trauma (45.8%), and all these conditions were more frequent in patients who fulfilled diagnostic criteria for any kind of dissociative disorder. Finally, when treated, patients reported lower dissociative symptoms. Results confirmed previous research about distress in gender dysphoria and improved mental health due to sex reassignment procedures. However, it resulted to be difficult to ascertain dissociation in the context of gender dysphoria, because of the similarities between the two conditions and the possible limited application of clinical instruments which do not provide an adequate differential diagnosis. Therefore, because the body uneasiness is common to dissociative experiences and gender dysphoria, the question is whether dissociation is to be seen not as an expression of pathological dissociative experiences but as a genuine feature of gender dysphoria.

Disclaimer: I have only read the abstract for this article and abstracts can be misleading sometimes, this is actually a problem with a lot of blog posts around these issues. I have since read the article

This article is interesting because it shows a link between dissociation and gender dysphoria and notes a link between the two. Further people with dissociative symptoms show more distress than those that do not. There is also a high rate of childhood abuse which is also seen in a few other studies. I consider my own dysphoria to be essentially dissociation and I wasn’t able to become truly embodied until I accepted my body as it is and let go of my cross-gender identity. Here is an article by twentythreetimes from the female detransitioner perspective.

This study showed a high amount of trauma, and even more so for the people with dissociative symptoms. Also this article showed that after treatment for gender dysphoria these patients showed lower levels of dissociation. This makes a lot of sense based on what I know about trauma.

Basically, in order to reduce the distress and symptoms caused by trauma is there are three things you can do, often in combination.

1) You can learn to cope with the symptoms and how to tolerate them better. You can learn mindfulness, and distress tolerance skills. You can learn to come back to your body quicker. You can learn not to panic about your symptoms causing distress on top of distress. This can help reduce the severity and intensity of the symptoms but will not eliminate them.

2) You can work on reducing / eliminating triggers. There are various ways to do this. There are behavioral techniques such as Exposure therapy and newer techniques like EMDR These are ways to alter or even eliminate the traumatic imprints make triggers effect one less or even not at all this. This can be a quick or lengthy process depending on the type and severity of the trauma.

3) You can avoid the triggers. Trauma is contextual. A person with trauma is usually not continuously in a traumatized state. They enter into the traumatized state in response to a trigger, which is a sight, sound or other environmental cue that holds an association to the original traumas then placing the person back in the place and time where it happened as if it is happening right now. If you can identify these triggers you might be able to avoid situations where they happen, however there is a significant cost for that in diminished aliveness.

In particular if the trauma is gendered, you might be able to avoid the context of trauma and the triggers by not seeing yourself or having others see you in that gender. In my own case my trauma was around it being unsafe to be a soft sensitive man, so I felt like I couldn’t be myself and be a man. I was perceived as an atypical woman when I was perceived as a woman too, but that was no problem because it didn’t trigger the context of the trauma. Of course I instantly felt unsafe if I was perceived as a man by others or even if I knew that people knew I was trans because that meant that I could really be a feminine man and hence in potential great danger. So transition did help me be more myself in that sense, however it came with significant costs as I was disconnected from my body and constantly stressed about people knowing if I was trans.

So it doesn’t surprise me at all that we see relief after transition. It is also important to note that 70% of the subjects studied did not have a dissociative condition and 55% did not have a childhood trauma history. Trauma is only part of the etiology of gender dysphoria, but I definitely think it is a large part for some.

This doesn’t mean that people with trauma shouldn’t transition, this doesn’t mean that those whose gender issues arise partially from trauma are somehow “less real” We should appreciate multiple factors of causality as is typical for most things in psychology.

Again, transition and gender dysphoria treatment are helpful that seems pretty clear from the evidence. I just think that gender should not be treated as its own special box and should be viewed holistically and connected to other parts of the psyche. I am also not saying that those with trauma should not transition, but ideally it would be best to work through as much of that as possible before making permanent changes. Sometimes this is not possible, and people may need to ease some of their gender distress in order to even begin working on trauma. That is part of why these issues can be so complicated.